Marecucina by Alno: the yacht among the kitchens

Marecucina. (photo: Alno AG)
Marecucina. (photo: Alno AG)

The name itself already gives the design away: The Marecucina by Alno is clearly nautically inspired. The worktop made of solid walnut veneer with narrow maple inlaid work is reminiscent of the deck of a boat, and the LED lighting panel of a sail. A special three-dimensionally milled edge defines the bow. On request, a mast with storage space and a chrome-plated railing can add further accents typical of ships. However, the Marecucina is not only a design object for individualists but also a functional kitchen. How it made its way from drawing board to series production is explained by Alno product designer Ulrich Dahm-Wachsmann, who played an important role in conceptualising and designing the Marecucina.

How did you get the idea of creating a kitchen like the Marecucina?
The design of kitchen furniture is heavily influenced by the architecture of living rooms. And from architecture, we know that nautical and maritime elements possess a very high degree of attractiveness. Virtually everyone connects positive memories with the sea and journeys on board ships and has sailed himself or herself or would like to do so. As such, we saw the opportunity, from a marketing aspect too, of being relatively sure of tapping into a certain basic sympathy with our design innovation. Even the very first sketches that I drew and which were not least inspired by the precise observation of beautiful yachts were greeted with great enthusiasm by the marketing and development team. As a result, the project more or less ran itself ÔÇô through to the serial production stage.

New Kitchen Trends at LivingKitchen 2011 in Cologne

Modern kitchens are masterpieces of technology that have turned into living rooms for the whole family. (photo: AMK)
Modern kitchens are masterpieces of technology that have turned into living rooms for the whole family. (photo: AMK)

By combining kitchen and dining room, people are placing new demands on their kitchens ÔÇô a wishlist that kitchen appliance and furnishings manufacturers have gladly picked up. Nothing is left to chance in the modern kitchen. Each area is custom-adapted to the individual needs of the residents and regular kitchen users.

Today, the kitchen as it can be seen at LivingKitchen (18.-23.01.2011) in Cologne, is a fully emancipated living area: a zone in which people can spend a pleasant evening with family and friends, as a matter of course. The past decade gave rise to sensational ideas developed by kitchen planners. As a result, compelling new innovations are arriving in the market as ÔÇ×complete kitchen packagesÔÇť that merge a wide array of preferences, demands and requirements. The innovation starts with detailed planning of light installations in the kitchen and the space; continues to the ergonomic and process-optimized placement of the various work and rest zones; and finishes with a myriad of open and closed storage space arenas.

Trend towards communicative live-in kitchens: cooking, dining and living areas are merging

photo: Leicht K├╝chen AG.
photo: Leicht K├╝chen AG.

The premiere event of LivingKitchen 2011 in Cologne will be showcasing the latest trends from the kitchen industry. One stylistic element that has been emerging in recent years and is rapidly gaining ground is the “communicative live-in kitchen”.

The trend of defining the kitchen as living space is evident in many exhibitors’ collections. RWK, for instance, is confident that the kitchen will merge with the dining and living areas to an even greater extent in future. Leicht’s kitchen designs are based on the same assumption. “A flowing transition between the kitchen and living area is influencing kitchen layouts right now. We’re using architectural emphasis to meet these new expectations from our customers,” says Stefan Waldenmaier, CEO of Leicht K├╝chen AG. At Johannes Brockmann, open-plan kitchen designs are also very much in demand. “The kitchen space is increasingly turning into a communication centre. Transitionless design and the inclusion of the dining and living areas will continue to be key themes,” says Peter Vennebusch of the trends for 2011.